The antik Knidos

Cnidus or Knidos was an ancient Greek city in Anatolia, part of the Dorian Hexapolis. It was situated at the extremity of the long Datça peninsula, which forms the southern side of the Gulf of Gokova.
The agora, the theatre, an odeum, a temple of Dionysus, a temple of the Muses, a temple of Aphrodite and a great number of minor buildings have been identified, and the general plan of the city has been very clearly made out. The most famous statue by Praxiteles, the Aphrodite of Knidos, was made for Cnidus. It has perished, but late copies exist, of which the most faithful is in the Vatican Museums.
  • The lighthouse of Knidos
  • Antique marble fresco
  • Knidos - archaeological excavation
  • The location of the Afrodit statue
Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic.

It was built partly on the mainland and partly on the Island of Triopion or Cape Krio. The debate about it being an island or cape is caused by the fact that in ancient times it was connected to the mainland by a causeway and bridge. Today the connection is formed by a narrow sandy isthmus. By means of the causeway the channel between island and mainland was formed into two harbours, of which the larger, or southern, was further enclosed by two strongly-built moles that are still in good part entire.

The extreme length of the city was little less than a mile, and the whole intramural area is still thickly strewn with architectural remains. The walls, both of the island and on the mainland, can be traced throughout their whole circuit; and in many places, especially round the acropolis, at the northeast corner of the city, they are remarkably perfect. The first Western knowledge of the site was due to the mission of the Dilettante Society in 1812, and the excavations executed by C. T. Newton in 1857-1858.
  • Lighthouse in Knidos
  • Antique marble stonework
  • Antique sundial in Knidos
  • Yacht habour in Knidos


Aphrodite of Cnidus


The statue of the "Aphrodite of Cnidus" became famous for its beauty, meant to be appreciated from every angle, and for being the first life-size representation of the nude female form. The statue became a tourist attraction in spite of being a cult image and patron of the Knidians. The Knidian Aphrodite has not survived. Possibly the statue was removed to Constantinople (modern Istanbul) and was lost in a fire during the Nika riots.
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Abright, unpretentious, impeccably outfitted and comfortable small hotel which deserves to be called the best in the town of Datça itself. The young Turkish-German family blends the instinctive friendliness of one with the dedication and savoir faire of the other. The hotel is set on a hilltop with a glorious sea view, a 5 min. walk from the beach and the harbour.

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